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CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

Xu Bing: Writing Between Heaven and Earth                
February 21, 2015 - May 24, 2015 

The character shu in ancient Chinese signifies books, written characters, and the act of writing. This solo exhibition presents the shu art of Xu Bing (b. 1955-), the world acclaimed contemporary Chinese artist, from his Book from the Sky to Book from the Ground and Landscape Landscript in between. All these shu masterpieces demonstrate the art of writing as image. Together they create a Zen-like textual space drawing the audience into an artistic contemplation of the works while arousing their latent cognitive capacity to communicate with the works.

The interactive educational work, Square Word Calligraphy, uses components of Chinese characters. The work, created in a classroom setting, is a perfect fusion of eastern and western culture into one harmony. All these thought-provoking works of art will not only challenge the viewers' preconception about written language and cultural identity, they will also invite them to interact with the art. This exhibition is designed to serve and educate people of different cultures and nationalities with his art. "My aim is to make an art that truly serves the people."

Curated by Professor Lidu Yi.

We are deeply grateful to the Jane Hsiao Asian Art Endowment for support of this exhibition. Additional support has been provided by the Asian Studies Program at FIU.

 

Mónica Bengoa: Exercices de Style / Exercises in Style           
February 14, 2015 - April 26, 2015

Mónica Bengoa’s works in felt, paper, embroidery may be best understood within the interdisciplinary contexts of contemporary artistic practices. The artist’s grounding in Post-Minimalist strategies including repetition, labor-intensive hand work, and subjective content reflect her passionate interest in the ordinary details of seemingly unimportant activities, events, places, things, and routines as subject matter.

Exercices de Style / Exercises in Style are directly based on the French writer Raymond Queneau’s book of the same title. Bengoa has reproduced nineteen stories from Queneau’s ninety-nine stories, each of which is an unusually inventive literary variation of the first brief story titled “Notations / Notation.” Bengoa has followed Queneau’s titles for each story and retained the page numbers on each of her works. Her principal objective was to create a visual form in diverse mediums corresponding to his innovative literary exercises. 

In realizing this extraordinary visual-literary dialogue, Bengoa developed a series of processes, beginning with tearing out the pages, wrinkling them, photographing them, working on them digitally, hand tracing and then cutting each word to create a visual transformation of a literary gem.

Nationally and internationally recognized, her work was shown at The Drawing Center, New York (2014); MOCA Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2007); 52 Venice Biennial (2007); IV Biennale Internationale de la Photographie et des Arts Visuels de Liège, Musée d’Art moderne et d’Art contemporain, Liège, Belgium (2004). Among her many awards: The Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, New York (2015); FONDART Grant, Ministry of Culture, Santiago. Bicentennial Grant. Project, “Felt as a new material for an optic exercise.” (2009)

The translations of the French stories in English will be accessible as an e-book in an iPad inside the gallery.

This exhibition is curated by Julia P. Herzberg, guest curator. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Chile, Embassy of Chile provided the transportation of the art work. Additional support has been provided by the Facultad de Artes, The Pontifical Catholic University of Chile and the Isabel Aninat Galeria de Arte in Santiago.

A Conversation between Mónica Bengoa and Julia P. Herzberg 

 

Wolfsonian Teaching Exhibition:
Visualizing the Information Age: Data, Design, and Display

February 1, 2015 – April 19, 2015           

In the twentieth century, truth became statistical. Numbers and data provided a new way to understand such concepts as health, population, work, and territory, and a new language through which parties and states advanced their agendas. Technologies from typewriters and cash registers to radio, television, and stock tickers, assembled, organized, and communicated social and economic data, while methods of social surveying grouped people into “statistical communities.”

In order to convey information about these statistical communities, graphic designers developed graphs and charts that represented the abstract and quantitative in visual form. They hoped that these graphic forms of information would offer an objective, scientific basis for the resolution of conflicts and the regulation of society. Visualizing the Information Age shows how the work of these designers provided a new medium for the conduct of social and political debate, even as it encoded the cultural prejudices and presumptions of the day.

Guest curator: Kenneth Lipartito, FIU Professor of History, with Peter Clericuzio, Academic Programs Manager, The Wolfsonian-FIU.

 

25 Sq. inches The Faces of the Permanent Collection
October 1, 2014 - April 5, 2015

As one of the most scrutinized and depicted subjects, the human face is perhaps the most important theme in the history of art. The
face has perpetually captivated and inspired artists and artisans. From ancient Egypt to the Renaissance, from photography to Pop
Art, man's fascination with the face is eternal. Drawn from the permanent collection of the Frost Art Museum. Curated by Klaudio
Rodríguez. For more info click here

 

Deep Blue by Javier Velasco

Spanish multi-media artist has been commissioned to do a site-specific work in the atrium of the Frost Art Museum. He used fused glass to create beautiful works that are allegories to the ephemeral, and speak to the fragility of nature and the environmental concerns of today.

 

 

OTHER THINGS TO SEE

The Kenan-Flagler Family Discovery Gallery
The Kenan-Flagler Family Discovery Gallery allows visitors to experience interactive activities designed to educate and entertain. This state-of-the-art Discovery Gallery consists of 13 stations including the computer-based display, Picture Yourself, where a camera takes an image of a person’s face and reproduces it on a touch screen. Participants can then trace the contours of the face with their fingers and print the finished product. The Kenan-Flagler Discovery Gallery is possible due to the support of the William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust. The William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust was established in 1965 from the estate of William Rand Kenan, Jr., who was born in Wilmington in 1872 and graduated from UNC in 1894. Kenan was a scientist, chemical and mechanical engineer, business executive, dairy farmer and philanthropist.

 


 

 
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